FAQ / Q & A

This page is here just to save me a bit of time, as I get asked the same questions very frequently. The majority of emails I receive are from people who just skimmed the mod pages and didn't read through all the way. If you have a question on where to buy something, what the pinout is, etc, please re-read the page, as the answer is most likely there.

Here they are, in no particular order:

Q: Why RGB?
A:
Because it's the best possible signal you can get from the "classic" video game systems.  The RGB Guide explains everything you need to get started. 

Q: Will you mod my console for me?
A:
RetroRGB isn't a modding service, but luckily, other people are!  I'll link to trusted modders on each console's individual page

Q: How come your mod is different than another one I've seen?
A: A lot of times there are two ways to do the same thing and mine is just the way I've always done it. Either way, every mod on my site was tested by me personally, multiple times. That being said, if you know of a better way to do something, I'd always love to hear about it.

Q: Will light guns work on an RGB monitor?
A:
Yes! Every light gun I've tried works on an
RGB monitor, when the system is hooked up directly to the RGB monitor (or through a switch). That being said, if you add another device (downrezzr, upscaler, signal converter), it may not. Here's video proof (please excuse the poor quality video, I just shot it quickly with my iPad):

Q: Why do you mostly link to RGB cables from Retro Console Accessories, or Retro Gaming Cables?  Are there other choices?
A:
 I link to those stores, because their stock and customer service is reliable and the cables have generally been good quality.  Some people on the forums reported issues, but generally they're good quality (RCA posted a great response).  If you're really concerned about quality, you can contact them directly to request extra shielding on the cables, or try to hunt down an original (expensive) RGB cable from the original console manufacturer.  You could also try making your own cables, or add a dsub connector to your console and buy high quality VGA or VGA/BNC cables.

Q: Your guides suggest using 75 ohm resistors in the mods involving the THS7314 RGB amp, but some people say it makes the output too bright.
A:
I've found that the output is slightly brighter than stock consoles, however it's not a huge difference.  It's strongly recommended that you only use 75 Ohm on the output side, but you can add resistors to the input side as well.  For more information, please see my THS7314 page.


Q:  Why do some of your mods show pictures of hot glue?
A:
  I use small dabs of hot glue to keep wires away from places they could get damaged.  I find small amounts of glue, non-conductive tape and double-sided tape to be very helpful in making mods neater and to keep wires safe.  That being said, both glue and tape should be used sparingly.


Q:  Why do people on forums get so mad about glue?
A:  I'd like to think that people have genuine intentions and that they're trying to help beginners learn proper modding skills.  The truth is, using glue on solder joints is never the right thing to do.  That being said, soldering small pins can be very difficult.  If your intention is to only mod one console and never touch a soldering iron again, there are many little "wrong" tricks that will allow you to accomplish the mod and it'll work fine.  I used to show some of these tricks in my mods, but some people got very angry that I was inadvertently teaching "bad modding technique" and I see their point:  It would be more beneficial to everyone if I included better soldering tips on the pages that require hard mods, instead of showing beginner tricks.  That being said, some people are just mean and get enjoyment out of bashing anything and everything they can on forums...so if the latest fad is bashing people who use glue, that's what they'll jump on.


Q: How come you don't have a forum, so people can discuss your mods?
A: Unfortunately, forums require constant administration. I've met a lot of really awesome people on forums, but there's always a few trolls that ruin it for everyone else and I'd rather not waste my time trying to deal with people like that. I don't say anything in a forum that I wouldn't say to someone's face, but most people don't follow that rule. Also, some amazing forums already exist that have great people helping out.


Q:  How come your eBay feedback is so low?
A:  RetroRGB isn't a "modding service", it's just a site that provides information.  The only things sold through the store are extra consoles, spare parts, etc.  As a result, I don't end up listing a lot of items.  Also, eBay's fees are getting ridiculously high, so I haven't been as interested in selling things lately; I'd have to charge a really high price to compensate for eBay's fees and I'm not sure that's fair to anyone.


Q: For your comparison shots, why did you take pictures, instead of screenshots or video captures?
A: My goal was to present things to you the exact way my eyes saw them during testing. Playing a video of a recorded RGB signal via YouTube on your laptop is really not a good representation of what the console is actually outputting, as your monitor will greatly effect how the picture looks. You need to see it on an RGB monitor, with scanlines in order to really grasp the differences.

All the pictures on my site (other than stock console pics) were taken by me personally, with a DSLR, using a prime lens, tri-pod and the same manual settings. Also, the camera was always at the same height, in the same place, the same distance away. Finally, all comparison shots for each system were taken at the same time. Said differently, I didn't take "SNES shot #1" on a Saturday morning and then "SNES picture #2" a week later on a Friday night...every time a picture comparison was taken, it was one right after the other to make sure the lighting was identical. As a result, the pictures reflect exactly what my eyes saw on my Sony PVM RGB monitor.


Q: Why did you use pictures, instead of video?
A:
I have the proper still camera equipment, but don't own any video equipment, or the editing software required to present a side-by-side comparison.


Q: The site is called RetroRGB, yet it includes Dreamcast, Wii and PS3. What do you consider the cutoff point for a "retro" system and why? 
A:  At the moment, the cutoff I've set for myself is HD systems, where "HD" is referring to 720p and up.  I'll eventually aim for every console, but I'm sticking to the "classics" for now.

 

That's it for now! I'll add more as necessary. Feel free to head back to the homepage!