Getting csync from consoles

This page shows how to get csync from each console.  This page is for advanced users, so I didn't include diagrams or how-to instructions, just descriptions and links.  Please see the main sync page if you need more info on csync.

You'll see below that sometimes I suggest adding a sync stripper to an RGB SCART cable as a solution.  This can be added to the SCART connector itself, using the existing wires:  Remove the cable from the SCART sync pin and wire it to "composite-in" on the sync stripper.  Then, tap into the existing SCART pins to get power and ground; check each pin with a multimeter to make sure you're using the right ones.  Finally, wire csync-out on the sync stripper to the sync pin on the SCART connector.  This can be used in ANY situation where an RGB SCART cable is using composite video as sync.  Alternatively, you could just use a Sync Strike, but that's an expensive way to accomplish the exact same thing.

Also, if you decide to wire a custom connector directly to the video chip, it's best to research the exact model and revision system you have (including the exact video chip), to make sure you're using the correct pinout for the chip in your system.

Consoles:

NES / Famicom - Both the PC-10 and NESRGB mods offer csync output.

Sega Master System - You can get csync by wiring a custom connector directly to the video chip, or by using a cable that gets sync from pin 1 on the A/V connector.

Sega Genesis - You can get csync by wiring a custom connector directly to the video chip, or by using a cable that gets sync from pin 1 (for the Genesis 1) or pin 5 (for Genesis 2, CDX, 32x) on the A/V connector. Genesis 3's will require connecting the RGB lines from the Sony CXA1645 chip to the A/V connector and csync will differ with each model; Some Genesis 3 model's ship with csync already connected to pin 5 on the multi-out, but for others, you'll need to get it from the sync-in pin (pin 10) on the CXA1645 chip.

Super Nintendo (NTSC) -  You can get csync by wiring a custom connector directly to the video chip, or by using a cable that gets sync from pin 3 on the multi-out connector.

Super Nintendo (PAL) -  You can get csync by wiring a custom connector directly to the video chip, or by adding a sync stripper to an RGB cable that gets sync from luma (pin 7) or composite video (pin 9) on the multi-out connector (luma recommended).

Sega Saturn -  You can get csync by wiring a custom connector directly to the video chip, or by using a cable that gets sync from pin 1 on the A/V connector.

Atari Jaguar - All video outputs are available on the back connector, including csync which is pin 5B.  I've seen other sites claim the Jaguar requires a sync stripper, but I can confirm that 5B definitely outputs csync.  For more information on the a/v pinout, see the Jaguar section.

Philips CDi - Most front-loading CDi systems use the Sony CXA1145 video chip, which output csync.  All CDi's require a custom connector, as they don't have a standard RGB-out.  Check the CDi page for a detailed RGB mod.

3DO - All 3DO systems require a pretty complicated RGB mod, which includes a sync stripper.  I suggest following the mods exactly as listed, but use a custom connector, to make it easier to get cables for all switches and displays.

N64 - The easiest way to get csync from an N64 is by adding a sync stripper to an RGB cable that gets sync from luma (pin 7) or composite video (pin 9) on the multi-out connector (luma recommended).  You can try getting csync directly from the chip, but I've had mixed success with this method.  You could also try the suggestions from mmmmonkey's guide as well.

Sony Playstation - None of the Playstation systems output csync through their A/V ports.  I suggest adding a sync stripper to the luma pin in an RGB SCART cable. Another solution would be to make your own output port and get csync directly from the Playstation's video chip.  The earlier models use a CXA1645, where you can tap all the RGB signals, plus csync.  The later models use a much smaller IC called H7240, or a re-branded version labeled "Sony A2160".  If you have the Sony version, you can tap csync from the via marked in the lower-right picture.  If you have the H7240, you'll have to solder directly to the chip, which is extremely hard and should only be done by people with SMD soldering experience.  Unless you plan on adding your own output to the system, it's easiest to just use a custom cable, getting sync from luma. (Thanks to Oerg866 for the tip and pictures!):

Nintendo GameCube - The best way to use a GameCube is via a modified digital-out cable that's outputting VGA:  This will allow 240p (as RGB), as well as 480i and 480p.  This may cause an issue with SCART switches, but if you're using a 480p source, you should probably use an alternative switch anyway.  Only PAL GameCube's output RGB and you'll need to add a Sync Stripper to the composite video line on the RGB SCART cable for it to get csync (there is no luma on PAL GC's).  Please see the Game Cube page for more info on it's output signals.

Sega Dreamcast - I strongly recommend getting a "VGA Box" that will also output RGB (including csync).  Check the Dreamcast page for more info:    http://www.retrorgb.com/dreamcast.html

Playstation 2 - None of the Playstation systems output csync from their A/V port.  If you only plan on using RGB SCART (240p + 480i), you'll need to add a sync stripper to the cable.  If your switch and display support component video (VGA switches will not, BNC might), then I suggest just using component, as it'll support every resolution.  If you need VGA, I suggest getting a component to VGA converter that also supports RGB, such as the Key Digital KD-CTCA3 (links to the right).  They convert component to VGA and (provided your display supports it) will output all resolutions: (240p, 480i, 480p).  I've seen a few guides online that describe how to tap VGA directly from the PS2's motherboard, but have not gotten them to work.  Feel free to contact me if you have more information about this.

Nintendo Wii - If you have a PAL Wii (NTSC Wii's won't output RGB) and only plan on using RGB SCART (240p + 480i), you'll most likely need to add a sync stripper to the SCART cable.  If your switch and display support component video (VGA switches will not, BNC might), then I suggest just using component, as it'll support every resolution (turn off "progressive mode" if you want VC games to switch to 240p, otherwise they'll stay in 480p).  If you need VGA, I suggest getting a Key Digital KD-CTCA3, as stated above (links to the right).  They convert component to VGA and (provided your display supports it) will output all resolutions: (240p, 480i, 480p).

As an FYI, videogameperfection.com has tested a few other component to RGB/VGA boxes, so if you can't find the Key Digital, give those a try:  http://www.videogameperfection.com/2014/08/08/startech-component-transcoder/

 

I hope this page had everything you needed, but feel free to contact me if I missed anything. Also, more sync information can be found in the main sync page